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Moona Al-Qahtani: Capturing Fashion

Despite photography’s prominence, fashion illustration continues to hold a certain allure within the industry. Jean-Philippe Delhomme’s painterly brushstrokes for Barney’s ad campaigns, Ruben Toledo’s whimsical watercolors for Nordstrom, and David Downton’s ability to capture a fashion icon with a few lines, have left an indelible impression on us.

Always on the look out for new talent, we sat down with Moona Al-Qahtani, a young Saudi fashion illustrator, who interpreted this season’s 40’s influence for D’NA.

When did you become interested in fashion illustration?

My mom used to make our school uniforms and dresses for special occasion. She would purchase McCalls catalogues and Vogue patterns, and I was very inspired by the illustrations in them. Vogue was also always around growing up, since my sister Mo-d is a Vogue-aholic. Every now and then they would publish breathtaking illustrations that stood out from all the photography.

Today my approach is a little different in that most of my illustrations are done digitally.

Is fashion illustration important today?

Defiantly. I think there is an allure to seeing fashion interpreted in a less literal way. It’s also still an important part of the creative process. When you think about the amazing pieces that come down a runway, most began life as illustrations.

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Where did you learn how to draw?

I taught myself. I grew up in a house where if you wanted to learn something, they would provide you with the necessary tools to teach yourself. I realize now it was an advantage because it allowed me to grow and develop my own style.

Are there fashion illustrators whose work you admire?

I’ve always admired the great Vogue illustrators like René Bouché, Count René Bouët-Willaumez and Rene Gruau. Confident strokes, an economy of color and incredible results!

Discover Moona’s illustrations at PSYCHOMAGIC.

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